Mistaken GPS alert leads to former alderman’s arrest for probation violation | Local News | kenoshanews.com

There are many things that can be said about this article.  The one I’d like all to take away from it is that, someone was forced to wear a device that after they obtained permission and was told that their device would be updated, a tax-payer paid worker didn’t update the record, then an innocent man was arrested and incarcerated for a period of time because of a paperwork mistake.  Tax-payer funds were used to issue that warrant, to dispatch the officers do serve the warrant, and the cost to the family to go pick him up from jail once he was released from his false imprisonment, because of a paperwork mistake.

There was no accountability and I can assure you, the probation agent didn’t think anything of it, because to them it was just “a paperwork mistake” that had real life consequences for another human being.

The documents state that Ruffolo had asked his agent for permission to extend his curfew on Jan. 24 so he could attend an event. The agent gave him permission to be out until midnight. However, the GPS schedule was mistakenly not reset for the adjusted curfew.

Source: Mistaken GPS alert leads to former alderman’s arrest for probation violation | Local News | kenoshanews.com

Huge stakes, little difference on crime – Isthmus | Madison, Wisconsin

Of these 122 opinions involving criminals, Neubauer took part in 78 and Hagedorn in 74, either singly or as part of three-judge panels. Both generally ruled against criminal defendants, rejecting arguments that evidence was improperly obtained or defendants received ineffective assistance of counsel, among other challenges.

Source: Huge stakes, little difference on crime – Isthmus | Madison, Wisconsin

 

In April, we will be voting for a new Wisconsin Supreme Court Justice.  Here are two of the contenders.  They come from the same court and this article is an analysis of the rulings they made and how they ruled vs what may be said during their campaign.

The link is safe, as I have read every article and click every link prior to posting.

“Implied Consent” and the Fourth Amendment Go To the US Supreme Court | Sherry F. Colb | Verdict | Legal Analysis and Commentary from Justia

What exactly does “implied consent” mean? In the Fourth Amendment area, consent—unmodified—means that a person has agreed to allow the police to do something that they might otherwise need a warrant or probable cause or some other justification to do. For example, say police pull you over for speeding while you are driving down the highway, and they then ask whether you mind if they search your car. A response of “not at all, officer; go right ahead” constitutes consent to the search of your vehicle. Without your permission, the Fourth Amendment would bar the vehicle search absent probable cause or some exception to the probable cause requirement. The theory behind consent is that if you say police may search or seize or do something else that they ordinarily may not do, then police act reasonably when they act on that consent. Consent searches and seizures are efficient, because they spare the police the need to jump through procedural hoops.

Source: “Implied Consent” and the Fourth Amendment Go To the US Supreme Court | Sherry F. Colb | Verdict | Legal Analysis and Commentary from Justia

 

Here is the case that is referred to in the article: Mitchell v Wisconsin